Child Support FAQs

Child support is crucial to a child and its upbringing, and it’s extremely important to understand child support laws work so that you know that your child will be supported throughout their young life. Here are some common questions and answers about child support.

What does child support cover?

Child support is intended to cover the expense of giving a child its basic living necessities like food, shelter, clothing, education, the cost of necessary medical treatment, and recreational activities. Child support has also been designed so that it provides support to the custodial parent and living expenses.

How is the amount of child support calculated?

Various factors help determine child support, which usually relates to the financial situation of the child and its parents. A court’s decision is often influenced by the income level of the parents, their earnings capacity, education, and financial background. Other factors could include if the custodial parent has remarried and is receiving financial support from their new spouse. There can be other factors involved that depend on state laws which is why it’s important to consult with a family law lawyer in your state about child support.

Can the amount of child support be modified?

The custodial parent does have the opportunity to change the amount of child support if the financial situation of either parent changes significantly. That would mean that the parents would need to file a petition for child support modification with the court. Proof will need to be provided that indicates these changes.

Does child support end automatically when the child turns 18?

Usually, a child is considered an adult when they reach the age of 18 and a judge might even state that child support expires when the child reaches the age of 18. However, child support can continue if it’s shown that the child has a mental or physical issue that makes them dependent on parental support going into adulthood.

What if the other parent refuses to pay child support?

If the other parent refuses to pay child support this should be reported immediately to the court. If the parent fails to pay child support it could result in various legal consequences like being contempt of court or even criminal charges in serious cases. The paying parent will still owe the past due amounts. 

 

You most likely have a lot more questions dealing with child support. There’s a lot to be concerned about when determining child support, so speaking with a family lawyer Tampa FL from a law firm like The McKinney Law Group.